1. 08 Jul, 2016 1 commit
  2. 30 Jun, 2016 3 commits
    • Drew's avatar
      Un-deprecate WMO setting · 3c62219a
      Drew authored
      We can't enable WMO for Release on Linux yet, see https://github.com/AnarchyTools/atbuild/issues/110
      3c62219a
    • Drew's avatar
      Add actual effects to the configurations · 8f797026
      Drew authored
      This extends #104 by adding actual effects to the configurations rather than have them be no-ops.
      
      Effects include:
      
      * debug instrumentation (new in this PR), for emitting `-g` (see #73 for an obvious extension)
      * optimization control / WMO control
      * compression level (faster debug atbins)
      * test instrumentation (`-enable-testing`)
      * `#if ATBUILD_RELEASE` etc. from Swift code
      
      There are some deprecations associated with this PR:
      
      * `whole-module-optimization` atllbuild option is now deprecated; use `--configuration release` instead.  There currently is no plan to control these separately, use `--configuration plain` + `:compileOptions ["-O"]` to get optimization without WMO.  Or open a bug to complain about this change.
      * `magic` atllbuild option is now deprecated; to opt out of magic use `--configuration none` instead.
      
      Doc PR to follow.
      
      In addition, CI is now updated to produce release (optimized) builds for atbuild, which significantly optimizes atbuild performance.
      8f797026
    • Drew's avatar
      Remove atllbuild option swiftc-path · 3798f21b
      Drew authored
      This option was deprecated in atbuild 0.9.0.  Use `--toolchain` on the CLI instead.
      
      Users should have had enough time to migrate at this point.
      3798f21b
  3. 21 Jun, 2016 1 commit
  4. 07 Jun, 2016 1 commit
  5. 27 May, 2016 1 commit
  6. 21 May, 2016 1 commit
    • Drew's avatar
      Implement configurations · b2ba7bbe
      Drew authored
      This implements, more or less, the scaffolding described in #36.  This commit does not actually make tools behave differently in any configuration (so this is mostly a placebo) but after this, tools can adjust their behavior.
      
      Notable additions/departures from the original proposal include:
      
      * Support for "custom" configurations outside the built-in set
      * The addition of `test` and `bench` as built-in configurations, since 2/2 developers use them
      * Internal API has new "helper" methods for common "tool questions" (should we optimize, are we testing, etc.)  Ideally, custom configurations could indicate their own values for these questions, although that's outside the scope of this patch.
      
      Doc PR to follow.
      b2ba7bbe
  7. 18 May, 2016 1 commit
    • Drew's avatar
      Fix WMO · 1aba8e49
      Drew authored
      We previously used a (pretty bad) hack for WMO.  This resulted in issues like #92.
      
      Upstream now has proper support for WMO (see generally, https://github.com/apple/swift-llbuild/pull/28, https://bugs.swift.org/browse/SR-881).
      
      We now use the upstream feature to handle this case.  We also add -num-threads support, which upstream recently added.
      
      Note that our implementation now only works for swift-DEVELOPMENT-SNAPSHOT-2016-05-09-a and above.
      
      Resolve #92
      1aba8e49
  8. 12 May, 2016 4 commits
  9. 11 May, 2016 3 commits
    • Drew's avatar
      Add ATBUILD_BIN_PATH · 5e877eb5
      Drew authored
      This adds a new environment variable to point to the bin path.  This is useful for custom tool packagers.
      
      We also unified the implementation of shell and custom tool environments in the new Shell.environment function.
      
      There are some minor changes to the custom tool environment that come along with this change, such as running in the directory of the imported package.  To my knowledge, I'm the only one who will notice.
      5e877eb5
    • Drew's avatar
      6c8802e0
    • Drew's avatar
      Modify filenames for compressed atbin · 9a26e865
      Drew authored
      new format is {name}-{version?}-{target}.atbin.tar.xz
      9a26e865
  10. 10 May, 2016 4 commits
    • Drew's avatar
      Support atbin compression · 3982ceb4
      Drew authored
      3982ceb4
    • Drew's avatar
      Add only-platforms · 658955ba
      Drew authored
      A task-level mechanism to skip tasks on some platforms
      658955ba
    • Drew's avatar
      Set environment variable $ATBUILD_PACKAGE_VERSION · 36f4cbef
      Drew authored
      36f4cbef
    • Drew's avatar
      Add executable-name option to atllbuild · 8af5d3c8
      Drew authored
      We add an executable-name option to atllbuild, allowing the use of "non-module-safe" names for executables.  This includes e.g. hyphens, which are a legal executable name but not a legal module-name.
      
      Resolve #27.  This resolution was chosen (over name/module-name) because the module-name is used in several places (such as Frameworks for example) and the executable case seems to be the odd one out at present.
      8af5d3c8
  11. 05 May, 2016 1 commit
  12. 28 Apr, 2016 2 commits
    • Drew's avatar
      Change name to `compiled.atpkg` · 393fb733
      Drew authored
      393fb733
    • Drew's avatar
      Add atbin support · 1c22e037
      Drew authored
      atbin is a proposed binary interchange format for atbuild and the
      broader AT ecosystem.
      
      atbuild has a weakly standardized input format: `build.atpkg`.  But what
      does atbuild, um, actually build?  What's the output format?
      
      There is no weak standard here, or even a convention.  It may build an
      executable, a static library, or a dynamic one, or even a framework; it
      may emit swiftmodule and swiftdoc files, or not.  A modulemap may or may
      not be part of the build products and clients may or may not need it in
      their search paths.
      
      The uncertainty here complicates interoperability.  atpm should download
      binary libraries, but what actually lives in that tarball?  Some random
      dylibs we found in `.atllbuild/products`?
      
      How do we build libraries for "fat" archs (like iOS, with 4 sub-archs)?
      How would we write an `atinstall` tool that installs/updates
      atpm/atbuild (or makes homebrew packages out of them)?
      
      atbin proposes to answer these questions, providing a simple, portable,
      hackable binary interchange format for all platforms and all AT
      projects.
      
      An `atbin` is a folder that ends in `.atbin`.  It contains, at least, a
      `built.atpkg` file.
      
      `built.atpkg` is clojure syntax identical to the more familiar
      `build.atpkg`.  You can include tasks or w/e in there, although why
      would want to, I'm not totally sure (this is Anarchy Tools though,
      knock yourself out.)  However, the important bit is this:
      
      ```clojure
      (package
          :name "foo"
          :payload "libFoo.a"
          :platforms ["ios-x86_64" "ios-i386"]
          :type "static-library"
      )
      ```
      
      (Other fields could also be present, this is not a complete enumeration)
      
      This `.atbin` folder will then contain:
      
      * `libFoo.a`, a fat library for the indicated platforms
      * (optional) a `ios-x86_64.swiftmodule` and `ios-i386.swiftmodule` file
      * (optional) a `ios-x86_64.swiftdoc` and `ios-i386.swiftdoc` file
      * (optional) a `module.modulemap` file
      
      You can, of course, build an `.atbin` by hand from existing binaries you
      found lying around your disk.  And we may eventually ship an `atbin`
      packager for Xcode or SwiftPM projects.
      
      However more practically, we introduce a new tool, `packageatbin`, which
      packages an `atbin` payload from atllbuild.
      
      ```clojure
      :package {
         :tool "packageatbin"
      
         ;; Generate a mypayload.atbin
         :name "mypayload"
      
         ;; When used with the new --platform ios, will build a fat binary for all iOS platforms.
         ;; Alternatively specific platforms can be listed here
         :platforms ["all"]
      
         ;; The atllbuild task to package.
         ;; Special logic will re-run this task for each platform and merge the resulting output.
         :atllbuild-task "myatllbuildtask"
      }
      ```
      
      The obvious application is as an interchange format for prebuilt
      `atllbuild` dependencies.  Presently, `atllbuild` can link with the
      output of any dependent atllbuild task, but if a library wasn't produced
      by a dependent task as part of the current build (but was say produced
      on a different computer a month ago) there's no "obvious" way to link to
      it.  This PR does not actually include any of that tooling, but it would
      be a straightforward extension of this work.
      
      An second application is the building of fat files.  Currently, there is
      no mechanism to build a "fat" library or binary in atbuild, or even to
      specify that we want one.  Under this PR, we can do it.
      
      A third application is a distribution format for executables.  If an
      `.atbin` contains an `executable`, `atpm` (or hypothetical `atinstall`)
      could install/update/administrate that executable similar to `homebrew`
      or `apt`, and keep all your buildtools (or other random crap) up to
      date.  We would need to extend this with version fields and whatnot, but
      again, it's straightforward.
      
      An fourth application, and my real motivation, is as an intermediate
      binary representation.  An `atbin` can be "downcast" with another tool
      to a platform-native format like `deb`, `bottle`, or `Framework`.  This
      would allow us to cut debs, rpms, and framework releases with
      appropriate AT tools.
      
      One alternative is to adopt an existing "standard", like Framework, for
      this purpose.  Indeed, `atbuild` currently produces frameworks on OSX.
      
      There are some complexities of extending frameworks to this case.  For
      one, the Framework implementation is warty and involves a lot of
      symlinks and things like codesigning.  We don't currently maintain that
      code for Linux hosts, nor is the standard especially sensible for Linux,
      as it relies on plists and choices basically unpopular on that platform.
      
      For another, frameworks are not really built to house static library or
      executable payloads, which are important to atbuild.  There are air-
      quote "obvious" ways to extend to nontraditional payloads, but IMO this
      is more confusing than it is helpful.  An explicit step to "cast down"
      your atbin to a framework lets us check that your framework will
      actually make sense to the likes of Xcode.
      
      For a third, it's unclear what platform some random Framework is built
      for, and what architectures it supports.  You can find out by scripting
      out to platform-specific tools, but it's not portable.
      
      Another alternative is to support multiple payloads/libraries in a
      single atbin, "one atbin to rule them all".  However I don't see what we
      accomplish there that we don't accomplish with multiple atbins, except
      specification complexity.  So let's not do that, at least not initially.
      
      `packageatbin` is included in core primarily because it needs tight,
      source-level integration with atllbuild.  In addition to peeking at the
      atllbuild options it needs to run the atllbuild task several times in
      order to produce fat binaries, which means it has to work around the
      usual dependency pruning logic.  For that reason it can't be sensibly
      implemented via the current custom tool API.
      1c22e037
  13. 25 Apr, 2016 2 commits
  14. 24 Apr, 2016 1 commit
    • Drew's avatar
      Add iOS support · 656d6bb3
      Drew authored
      This commit adds support for static libraries, dynamic libraries, and
      executables compiled for iOS.
      
      FAQ:
      
      Q: How do I build them?
      
      Use the new `--platform` strings:
      
      * `ios-x86_64`
      * `ios-i386`
      * `ios-arm64`
      * `ios-armv7`
      
      Q: What if I want to build for more than one architecture?
      
      Coming Soon
      
      Q: What is an iOS "executable", anyway?
      
      No idea, but it works!
      
      Q: What is not yet supported?
      
      - [ ] XCTest
      - [ ] Deploying or running iOS build products
      - [ ] Frameworks
      - [ ] Code signing
      - [ ] Compiling for iOS on Linux.  Believe it or not, I think this
            is actually possible for some programs, but I have no use for it
      656d6bb3
  15. 22 Apr, 2016 5 commits
  16. 21 Apr, 2016 1 commit
    • Drew's avatar
      Change to `.attool` · 5180ad67
      Drew authored
      @owensd convinced me that `plugin` is the wrong name.  We should call
      @them Custom Tools, with an extension `.attool`.  This emphasizes that
      @they are written for AT and provides something to google.
      5180ad67
  17. 19 Apr, 2016 1 commit
    • Drew's avatar
      Add plugin support · ecca2810
      Drew authored
      We're supposed to be building simple, hackable tools but atbuild is
      becoming more of a monolithic tool.  This patch aims to change that.
      
      There are many reasons some feature should not be included in core:
      
      1.  Core needs to be minimal so we can bootstrap it on new platforms;
          every new feature is a new burden
      
      2.  Core needs to be x-platform but many features do not
          (see: xcode-emit, packageframework)
      
      3.  Features may want different release frequency (see: xcode-emit) or
          don't want to coordinate with atbuild
      
      4.  Features may be "not part of AnarchyTools" (Caroline) but still
          commonly used together
      
      5.  I'm annoyed at upstream over the static linking issue, and thinking
          of ways to keep us from being that point of central failure that annoys
          somebody else someday
      
      Therefore, we introduce the world's simplest plugin system designed to
      move code out of core, or keep code out of core that doesn't need to be.
      
      xcode-emit and Caroline will consume this API.  packageframework is a
      good candidate for a plugin that might be moved out from core.
      
      Documentation to follow
      ecca2810
  18. 16 Apr, 2016 1 commit
  19. 15 Apr, 2016 6 commits
    • Drew's avatar
      Add NSFileManager again · ad1fb94c
      Drew authored
      ad1fb94c
    • Drew's avatar
      Add NSFileManager again · 1d34f85e
      Drew authored
      1d34f85e
    • Drew's avatar
      Resolve required overlays bug · e6c1b805
      Drew authored
      Resolve #66
      e6c1b805
    • Drew's avatar
      Replace bad diagnostic · aa38f859
      Drew authored
      Fixes #65
      aa38f859
    • Drew's avatar
      Add proper platform support · 9ecf5b64
      Drew authored
      Related to #36
      
      Presently, we tend to enable platform-specific config with an overlay.
      There are a variety of problems identified with this approach:
      
      1.  There is no convention for which overlay to use for platform-
      specific config.  This complicates the ecosystem.
      
      2.  In general, a program is always compiled "for some platform" but in
      practice a user may forget the necessary overlay.  `require-overlays`
      can catch this misconfig, but A) it has to be opted into in the atpkg,
      and B) there is no good way to default to the running platform, which is
      the sane behavior.
      
      3.  Currently, tools tend to conditionally-compile platform-specific
      code.  The effect of this is to complicate bootstrapping, as a Linux
      binary *cannot* perform some OSX behavior (and vice versa) because the
      necessary code is not present in the executable.
      
      4.  This is not scaleable to cross-compilation (iOS for example is
      Coming Soon but can't be supported in this architecture)
      
      To work around these problems, we introduce a `Platform` enum, to
      replace `PlatformPaths`.  `Platform` is a runtime technology, allowing
      for a Linux binary to reason about what the behavior would be on OSX
      etc.
      
      Internally, we have three "platforms":
      
      * `hostPlatform`, the platform on which `atbuild` is currently executing
      * `targetPlatform`, the platform for which we are compiling. By default
         this is the `hostPlatform`
      * `buildPlatform`, the platform where `swift-build-tool` will run.
         This is usually the `hostPlatform`, but if we are bootstrapping it
         is the `targetPlatform` instead.
      
      The user can override the `targetPlatform` by the use of `--platform
      foo`.  `linux` and `osx` are supported.  `mac` is supported as an alias
      of `osx`.
      
      The primary effect of a platform is to scope tool-specific behavior
      (e.g., target=OSX uses the OSX SDK, host=Linux uses a linux path for the
      toolchain, etc).
      
      In addition to the tool-specific behavior, we enable overlays for the
      target platform:
      
      * `atbuild.platform.linux` on Linux
      * `atbuild.platform.osx` and `atbuild.platform.mac` on OSX
      
      This allows packages to reliably perform per-platform configuration in
      the overlays.  Critically, some platform overlay is reliably active, so
      users in most cases will not have to `--use-overlay` to get proper
      platform behavior.
      
      DEPRECATION WARNING: We believe the `swiftc-path` key is no longer
      required, as the functionality used can be achieved either by
      `--toolchain` or `--platform`.  Therefore, I'm adding a warning to users
      that we intend to remove it and to try these features instead.
      
      We need to put out a release with these features (and the warning)
      before I'm happy to remove it.  In particular, we use it inside
      atbuild/atpkg, and removing it immediately would break bootstrapping, so
      let's give it a little time before we tear it out.  We should remove it
      from the documentation though.
      9ecf5b64
    • Drew's avatar
      Don't print stack trace for user-visible subcommand errors · ff977925
      Drew authored
      Per #72, these are not useful
      
      Resolve #72
      ff977925